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UCF #104200126

Toddler Edna Masters Strangely Vanished Without a Trace


Edna Bette-Jean Masters
COLD CASE

Edna Bette-Jean Masters

Kamloops, British Columbia — The Mounties are re-examining a missing-person case in British Columbia that dates back half a century, hoping renewed publicity might spark an old memory that could explain what happened to a 21-month-old toddler who vanished without a trace -- or possibly prompt the missing girl herself, if she is still alive, to come forward.

Edna Bette-Jean Masters disappeared on July 3, 1960, as she was playing at a friend's house in the Red Lake area, west of Kamloops in B.C.'s Interior.

Her disappearance prompted a massive search, but police and search-and-rescue personnel were unable to turn up any sign of her.

Now, investigators plan to use new technology, such as DNA examination and software that digitally ages photographs, in an effort to generate new leads in the case.

In 2013, the case was re-opened by B.C. RCMP after 50 years. Cpl. Cheryl Bush pointed out there has never been any evidence to suggest the girl is dead, raising the possibility Masters, who today would be 62 years old, is out there somewhere.

Edna Bette-Jean Masters
Edna Bette-Jean Masters went missing in 1960. A police sketch artist examined photos of Master's family members and created an age progression drawing to reflect what she may look like today. Image Credit: RCMP handout

"There is a possibility that this person is still alive. There was never any evidence found to the contrary," Bush said in 2013.

"If that's the case, then maybe this will spark somebody to ask some questions that they always wondered about their past."

Masters, who was referred to by her middle name, Bette-Jean, was last seen playing with family and friends at a friend's residence.

The young girl, who had curly blonde hair, blue eyes and a fair complexion, was wearing a green bonnet, a pink T-shirt and faded overalls at the time. She had an oval-shaped burn scar on her left arm, which investigators believe would still be there today.

When Masters was reported missing, the surrounding area was searched extensively. RCMP officers used an airplane and a police dog and enlisted the help of volunteers, but they were unable to turn up any trace of Masters.

One of the only leads was a sighting of an unfamiliar 1959 Chevrolet car with Alberta plates that was seen nearby with a man and woman in their late 20s. The car had either "cat eye" or "bat wing" tail lights, the RCMP said.

Investigators have never been able to determine the identities of the couple or whether they were connected to Masters' disappearance.

Masters' mother and two siblings are still alive and still wondering what happened to the young girl, said Bush.

Bush said police hope the attention to the case might prompt someone to remember a detail that could be related, no matter how seemingly insignificant, and contact police.

She said such reviews are routine in historic missing-person cases.

"It's part of our standard practice to review these files, just like any other RCMP detachment in the province, particularly for historical cases that were investigated prior to new technology or investigative techniques," she said.

Bush did not have any details about what specifically the review will involve or how long it might take.

Anyone with information on Bette-Jean disappearance, no matter how minor the detail, is asked to come forward and contact the rural RCMP at 250-314-1800. To remain anonymous, contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Danielle Banbury

Danielle Banbury

See more Case Files contributed by Danielle Banbury.

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9 + 9 = ?
Jeffrey Andrew Dupres
FEATURE
Jeffrey Dupres

Jeffrey Dupres told his mother he was going with his five-year-old friend to play next-door at his house. About 20 minutes later, the friend showed up looking for him.
Featured for 11 days

I moved there from Sudbury, ON, I now have also lived in Vancouver, BC for 10 years. The talks of bad things in Red Deer is a joke. Vancouver/Lower Mainland obvs has a lot of crime with larger population & favorable weather. Compare Red Deer to Sudbury for a more accurate comparison, and I'll tell you Sudbury is by far worse. Like, by far.

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